All Upcoming Events

On Wednesday at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Dr Andreas Braun
Topological String Theory
On Thursday at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Frederic Dreyer (LPTHE/CERN)
TBC
On Thursday at 14:15 in BIPAC seminar room, DWB, a seminar in the Cosmology series:
Patricia Larsen (Cambridge)
Topics in weak lensing
On Thursday at 14:30 in Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Colloquia Series Seminars series:
Swapan Chattopadhyay (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory & Professor and Director of Accelerator Research)
Accelerator Science Program at the FAST/IOTA Complex at Fermilab
On Thursday at 16:00 in L6, a seminar in the Number Theory series:
Rachel Newton (University of Reading)
The Hasse norm principle for abelian extensions
Further information: Let $L/K$ be an extension of number fields and let $J_L$ and $J_K$ be the associated groups of ideles. Using the diagonal embedding, we view $L^*$ and $K^*$ as subgroups of $J_L$ and $J_K$ respectively. The norm map $N: J_L\to  J_K$ restricts to the usual field norm $N: L^*\to K^*$ on $L^*$. Thus, if an element of $K^*$ is a norm from $L^*$, then it is a norm from $J_L$. We say that the Hasse norm principle holds for $L/K$ if the converse holds, i.e. if every element of $K^*$ which is a norm from $J_L$ is in fact a norm from $L^*$.  The original Hasse norm theorem states that the Hasse norm principle holds for cyclic extensions. Biquadratic extensions give the smallest examples for which the Hasse norm principle can fail. One might ask, what proportion of biquadratic extensions of $K$ fail the Hasse norm principle? More generally, for an abelian group $G$, what proportion of extensions of $K$ with Galois group $G$ fail the Hasse norm principle? I will describe the finite abelian groups for which this proportion is positive. This involves counting abelian extensions of bounded discriminant with infinitely many local conditions imposed, which is achieved using tools from harmonic analysis. This is joint work with Christopher Frei and Daniel Loughran.
On Thursday at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Frank Close (Oxford)
Half Life: the divided life of Bruno Maximovich Pontecorvo
On Friday at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Bernd Sturmfels (UC Berkeley)
Eigenvectors of Tensors
Further information: Eigenvectors of square matrices are central to linear algebra. Eigenvectors of tensors are a natural generalization. The spectral theory of tensors was pioneered by Lim and Qi around 2005. It has numerous applications, and ties in closely with optimization and dynamical systems.  We present an introduction that emphasizes algebraic and geometric aspects
On Monday at 14:15 in L4, a seminar in the Geometry and Analysis series:
Thomas Schick (Gottingen)
Obstructions to positive scalar curvature via submanifolds of different codimension
Further information: Question: Given a smooth compact manifold $M$ without boundary, does $M$  admit a Riemannian metric of positive scalar curvature?  We focus on the case of spin manifolds. The spin structure, together with a  chosen Riemannian metric, allows to construct a specific geometric  differential operator, called Dirac operator. If the metric has positive  scalar curvature, then 0 is not in the spectrum of this operator; this in  turn implies that a topological invariant, the index, vanishes.   We use a refined version, acting on sections of a bundle of modules over a  $C^*$-algebra; and then the index takes values in the K-theory of this  algebra. This index is the image under the Baum-Connes assembly map of a  topological object, the K-theoretic fundamental class.  The talk will present results of the following type:  If $M$ has a submanifold $N$ of codimension $k$ whose Dirac operator has  non-trivial index, what conditions imply that $M$ does not admit a metric of  positive scalar curvature? How is this related to the Baum-Connes assembly  map?   We will present previous results of Zeidler ($k=1$), Hanke-Pape-S. ($k=2$),  Engel and new generalizations. Moreover, we will show how these results fit  in the context of the Baum-Connes assembly maps for the manifold and the  submanifold.   
On Monday at 16:30 in DWB 501 (Seminar Room), a seminar in the Holography series:
Toby Wiseman (Imperial College)
Energy Bounds in Holographic CFTs
On Tuesday at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Relativity series:
Dr Nima Doroud (Cambridge DAMTP)
Superconformal Anyons
On Tuesday at 14:00 in DWB 501 Fisher Room, a seminar in the Holography series:
Ehsan Hatefi (Queen Mary)
Black Hole Formation and Critical Collapse in the Axion- Dilaton System in Diverse Dimensions
On Wednesday, June 8, at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Wenzhe Yang
Topological Quantum Field Theory
On Wednesday, June 8, at 17:00 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Colloquia Series Seminars series:
Professor Scott Tremaine FRS (Richard Black Professor, School of Natural Sciences, IAS, Princeton University)
Halley Lecture
On Thursday, June 9, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Marco Nardecchia (Cambridge)
On the recent flavour anomalies
On Thursday, June 9, at 14:15 in BIPAC seminar room, DWB, a seminar in the Cosmology series:
Anze Slozar (Brookhaven)
Here Be Dragons: exploring the redshift 2 to 6 universe
On Thursday, June 9, at 16:00 in L6, a seminar in the Number Theory series:
Joni Teräväinen (University of Turku)
Almost Primes in Almost all Short Intervals
Further information: When considering $E_k$ numbers (products of exactly $k$ primes), it is natural to ask, how they are distributed in short intervals. One can show much stronger results when one restricts to almost all intervals. In this context,  we seek the smallest value of c such that the intervals $[x,x+(\log x)^c]$ contain an $E_k$ number almost always. Harman showed that $c=7+\varepsilon$ is admissible for $E_2$ numbers, and this was the best known result also for $E_k$ numbers with $k>2$. We show that for $E_3$ numbers one can take $c=1+\varepsilon$, which is optimal up to $\varepsilon$. We also obtain the value $c=3.51$ for $E_2$ numbers. The proof uses pointwise, large values and mean value results for Dirichlet polynomials as well as sieve methods.
On Thursday, June 9, at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Guilherme Milhano (IST Lisbon)
Sense and sensitivity: from in-medium parton dynamics to QGP and jets
Further information: http://centra.ist.utl.pt/index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=71&Itemid=55
On Friday, June 10, at 14:00 in Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Theoretical Physics Colloquia series:
M J Perry (Cambridge)
tba
On Friday, June 10, at 15:30 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Colloquia Series Seminars series:
Swapan Chattopadhyay (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory & Professor and Director of Accelerator Research)
Quantum Sensors sans Frontier
On Monday, June 13, at 14:15 in L3, a seminar in the Geometry and Analysis series:
Wolfgang Ziller (University of Pennsylvania)
On the Nomizu conjecture and graph manifolds
On Tuesday, June 14, at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Quantum Field Theory series:
Klaas Landsman (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)
Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in lattice spin systems
On Tuesday, June 14, at 15:45 in L4, a seminar in the Algebraic and Symplectic Geometry series:
Alexandru Oancea (Jussieu)
TBA
On Wednesday, June 15, at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Pietro Benetti Genolini
RG flows and functions along RG trajectories
On Thursday, June 16, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Simon Kast (KIT)
Top-Flavoured Dark Matter in Dark Minimal Flavour Violation
On Thursday, June 16, at 14:15 in BIPAC seminar room, DWB, a seminar in the Cosmology series:
Daan Meerburg (CITA)
The holiest grail
On Thursday, June 16, at 16:00 in L6, a seminar in the Number Theory series:
Roger Heath-Brown (Oxford University)
Gaps Between Smooth Numbers
Further information: Let $a_1, \cdots, a_N$ be the sequence of y-smooth numbers up to x (i.e. composed only of primes up to y). When y is a small power of x, what can one say about the size of the gaps $a_{j+1}-a_j$? In particular, what about $$\sum_1^N (a_{j+1}-a_j)^2?$$
On Thursday, June 16, at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Jernej Kamenik (Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana)
Theory perspective on the LHC di-photon excess
On Friday, June 17, at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
David Vogan (MIT)
Conjugacy classes and group representations
Further information: One of the big ideas in linear algebra is {\em eigenvalues}. Most matrices become in some basis {\em diagonal} matrices; so a lot of information about the matrix (which is specified by $n^2$ matrix entries) is encoded by by just $n$ eigenvalues. The fact that lots of different matrices can have the same eigenvalues reflects the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. I'll look at how to make these vague statements (``lots of different matrices...') more precise; how to extend them from matrices to abstract symmetry groups; and how to relate abstract symmetry groups to matrices.
On Monday, June 20, at 01:00 , a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Jacob Lurie (Hardy Lecture Tour) Time/venue tbc (Harvard University)
'Formal Moduli Problems'
Further information: Abstract tba    
On Thursday, July 14, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Carsten Rott (Sungkyunkwan University)
TBD
On Friday, February 10, at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Eitan Tadmor (University of Maryland)
tba
Further information: tba