All Upcoming Events

On Thursday, May 28, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Thomas Blake & Ulrich Haisch (University of Warwick & University of Oxford)
Anomalous B decays (TBC)
On Thursday, May 28, at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Pat Scott (Imperial College)
Asymmetric dark matter in the Sun
Further information: arXiv:1411.6626
On Friday at 14:00 in Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Theoretical Physics Colloquia series:
Marc Mezard (ENS, Paris)
Statistical Physics and Information Theory: New Frontiers
On Friday at 16:15 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, a seminar in the Colloquia series:
Professor Cary Forest (Madison Physics Department, University of Wisconsin)
Chasing Fast Dynamos in the Plasma Lab
On Monday at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the String Theory series:
Matthias Wilhelm (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin)
TBA
On Monday at 14:15 in L4, a seminar in the Geometry and Analysis series:
Henry Schenck (Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Geometry of generalized barycentric coordinates
On Tuesday at 12:00 in L4, a seminar in the Quantum Field Theory series:
Sylvie Paycha (Potsdam)
Renormalisation and the Euler-Maclaurin formula on cones
Further information: [based on joint work with Li Guo and  Bin Zhang]  We apply to  the study of exponential sums on lattice points in convex rational polyhedral cones, the generalised algebraic approach of Connes and Kreimer to  perturbative quantum field theory.  For this purpose we equip the space of    cones   with a connected coalgebra structure. The  algebraic Birkhoff factorisation of Connes and Kreimer   adapted  and generalised to this context then gives rise to a convolution factorisation of exponential sums on lattice points in cones. We show that this factorisation coincides with the classical Euler-Maclaurin formula generalised to convex rational polyhedral cones by Berline and Vergne by means of  an interpolating holomorphic function. We define  renormalised conical zeta values at non-positive integers as the Taylor coefficients at zero of the interpolating holomorphic function.  When restricted to Chen cones, this  yields yet another way to renormalise multiple zeta values  at non-positive integers.  
On Wednesday at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Omar Kidwai (University of Oxford)
On Thursday at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Seyda Ipek (University of Washington)
TBC
On Thursday at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Mustafa Amin (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge)
TBA
On Friday, June 5, at 16:15 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, a seminar in the Colloquia series:
Professor Stephen Briggs (European Space Agency, Harwell Oxford)
Climate Observations from Space
On Monday, June 8, at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the String Theory series:
Peter West (Kings College, London)
TBA
On Tuesday, June 9, at 13:30 in L4, a seminar in the Algebraic and Symplectic Geometry series:
Valeri Alexeev (University of Georgia)
(COW SEMINAR) Uniformizing the moduli space of abelian 6-folds
Further information: By classical results of Mumford and Donagi, Mori-Mukai, Verra, the moduli spaces A_g of principally polarized abelian varieties of dimension g are unirational for g≤5 and are of general type for g≥7. Answering a conjecture of Kanev, we provide a uniformization of A6 by a Hurwitz space parameterizing certain curve covers. Using this uniformization, we study the geometry of A6 and make advances towards determining its birational type. This is a joint work with Donagi-Farkas-Izadi-Ortega.
On Tuesday, June 9, at 14:00 in DWB, Fisher Room, a seminar in the Holography series:
Ayan Mukhopadhyay (U. Crete)
Semi-Holography for QCD
On Tuesday, June 9, at 15:15 in L4, a seminar in the Geometry and Analysis series:
M S Narasimhan (TIFR Bangalore)
(COW seminar) The derived category of moduli spaces of vector bundles on curves
Further information: Let X be a smooth projective curve (of genus greater than or equal to 2) over C and M the moduli space of vector bundles over X, of rank 2 and with fixed determinant of degree 1.Then the Fourier-Mukai functor from the bounded derived category of coherent sheaves on X to that of M, given by the normalised Poincare bundle, is fully faithful, except (possibly) for hyperelliptic curves of genus 3,4,and 5  This result is proved by establishing precise vanishing theorems for a family of vector bundles on the moduli space M.  Results on the deformation  and inversion of Picard bundles (already known) follow from the full faithfulness of the F-M functor
On Tuesday, June 9, at 16:30 in L4, a seminar in the Algebraic and Symplectic Geometry series:
S. Ramanan
(COW SEMINAR) TBA
On Wednesday, June 10, at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Ryo Suzuki (University of Oxford)
On Thursday, June 11, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Andrea Ferroglia (New York City College of Technology)
TBC
On Thursday, June 11, at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Paul McFadden (Imperial College, London)
Soft limits in holographic cosmology
On Friday, June 12, at 14:00 in Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Theoretical Physics Colloquia series:
Israel Klich (Virginia)
tba
On Friday, June 12, at 16:15 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, a seminar in the Colloquia series:
Professor Swapan Chattopadhyay (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Northern Illinois University)
Parlez-vous Beams? Frontier of Beam Physics and Accelerator Science: from High Energy Particle Colliders to Quantum Degenerate Beams
On Monday, June 15, at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the String Theory series:
Seung-Joo Lee (Virginia Tech)
Quiver Invariant, Abelianisation and Mutation
Further information: In this talk, gauged quiver quantum mechanics will be analysed for BPS state counting. Despite the wall-crossing phenomenon of those countings, an invariant quantity of quiver itself, dubbed quiver invariant, will be carefully defined for a certain class of abelian quiver theories. After that, to get a handle on nonabelian theories, I will overview the abelianisation and the mutation methods, and will illustrate some of their interesting features through a couple of simple examples.
On Monday, June 15, at 14:15 in L4, a seminar in the Geometry and Analysis series:
Cristiano Spotti (Cambridge)
Hermitian metrics with constant Chern scalar curvature
Further information: I will discuss some properties of Hermitian metrics on compact complex manifolds, having constant Chern scalar curvature, focusing on the existence problem in fixed Hermitian conformal classes (the 'Chern-Yamabe problem'). This is joint work with Daniele Angella and Simone Calamai.
On Tuesday, June 16, at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the Relativity series:
Chris White (Glasgow)
TBA
On Tuesday, June 16, at 14:00 in L4, a seminar in the Algebraic and Symplectic Geometry series:
Ivan Smith (Cambridge)
Symplectic Khovanov cohomology
On Wednesday, June 17, at 12:00 in L5, a seminar in the Strings Junior series:
Juan Carlos Calvo Jackson (University of Oxford)
On Thursday, June 18, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
Isabel Garcia Garcia (University of Oxford)
TBC
On Thursday, June 18, at 16:15 in Sciama Lecture Theatre, a seminar in the Particles and fields series:
Biagio Lucini (University of Swansea)
Non-perturbative determinations of the spectrum and anomalous dimensions in near-conformal gauge theories
On Friday, June 19, at 15:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Gunnar Carlsson (Stanford University)
The Shape of Data
Further information: There has been a great deal of attention paid to 'Big Data' over the last few years.  However, often as not, the problem with the analysis of data is not as much the size as the complexity of the data.  Even very small data sets can exhibit substantial complexity.  There is therefore a need for methods for representing complex data sets, beyond the usual linear or even polynomial models.  The mathematical notion of shape, encoded in a metric, provides a very useful way to represent complex data sets.  On the other hand, Topology is the mathematical sub discipline which concerns itself with studying shape, in all dimensions.  In recent years, methods from topology have been adapted to the study of data sets, i.e. finite metric spaces.  In this talk, we will discuss what has been done in this direction and what the future might hold, with numerous examples.
On Friday, June 19, at 16:30 in Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, a seminar in the Colloquia series:
Professor Peter Webster (Georgia Institute of Technology)
The Halley Lecture: Understanding the Monsoon
On Friday, September 25, at 13:00 in Dalitz Institute, DWB, a seminar in the Particle Phenomenology Forum series:
John March-Russell (University of Oxford)
TBC
On Friday, November 20, at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Felix Otto (Max-Plank-Institute)
tba
On Friday, January 29, at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Mark Newman (Univ. of Michigan)
tba
On Friday, June 3, at 16:00 in L1, a seminar in the Math Colloquium series:
Bernd Sturmfels (UC Berkeley)
tba